Dansk
Uffe Isolotto

THE POCKET PHILOSOPHER’S CATHARSIS IN THE WINTER GARDEN

07. Sep 27. Oct 2013

In the tranquillity of the winter garden, the homespun philosopher sits and ponders. What is left for the artist to do in the digital age, when everyone is a producer of images? What kind of emotional discharge would fit this particular individual’s state of mind?

The scenario arises from the image Uffe Isolotto has of himself as a creative artist. At Overgaden, the image has become an installation with giant tulips, furniture made of organic copper tubes, and the torn-off limbs of the self-obsessed human.

The concept of the Procrustean bed is used when people try to tailor reality to fit their own preconceived ideas. According to Greek mythology, the giant Procrustes had an inn in a cave. He had two beds for his guests – one long and one short. By either stretching or cutting off the limbs of his guests, he made their bodies fit the beds.

Uffe Isolotto uses the myth as the departure point for his own ‘Procrustean’ furniture. The shapes and structures resemble ordinary furniture, but the sculptures are actually rough sketches of thought constructions. If you tried to sit on them, you’d fall through. Yet the meeting with the sculptures is dependent on our own body’s relationship to our surroundings. Isolotto’s homespun philosophy has found a place between the imagined and the physical world.

Uffe Isolotto’s stand-in, the homespun philosopher in the winter garden, struggles to find a posture that fits. The avatar is a personal, digital icon, representing the idea of a specific identity. Isolotto’s avatar figures repeatedly throughout the exhibition. The copies are self-referential, yet keep a beady eye on audience approval.

The artist has staged his universe in the same way as we stage ourselves in the world of social media. The links Uffe Isolotto makes between the role of the artist, the artwork and context are as self-conscious and genuine as Instagram pictures of Stone-age food or bare feet on the beach are staged, yet explicit, images of happiness.

Just as Uffe Isolotto has assumed the role of the artist, he has hired an actor as his doppelgänger. On the opening evening of the exhibition his double will play a key role in a wet performance.

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